Mundane Update

This week’s journal entry is going to be a little late because of equipment malfunction.  The recent storms fried the video card in one computer, and we’re sharing for the moment.  Since I have limited time this morning anyway, I’ve opted to give her the computer time now, and I’ll type in and upload the journal entry later today, or early tomorrow.

Cheers, and happy adventuring!

Gnomes of Erde

I took my ship back to Koenigsburg and have delivered the herbs to Tamzy as promised.  She is suspicious of my arrival, since she knows full well no ships have come into port recently, but she has not asked any questions.  I asked about her family, and she shook her head and told me about her uncle’s latest breeding exploits and that now no one in the family will let him manage the breeding for their sheep.  I was intrigued and decided to visit them to learn more.  I have been here a week, and I am… unsure…. To say that Gnomes are different is an understatement.

I’ve written what I’ve learned into my journal, and you can read about it here: Gnomes of Erde.

 


 

Special thanks to Samantha, one of my players, for bringing Erde’s Gnomes to brilliant life.  May the Bripple Clan live and prosper for many, many more generations.

 


 

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Unhur’ahn

I am now hiding in the library.  I might as well read while I’m here.  After learning about the Night of Red Sands I was curious about the nation those women created. Unhur’ahn is pronounced with long “u” sounds, like “dune” and a short “a” like… well, “ah.” Emphasis on the first and last syllables, so OON hoor AHN.  It’s very close to the Terran Swahili word “uhuru” which I find fascinating.

What I discovered about Unhur’ahn I have condensed and added to my journal. You may read it by clicking on this link: Unhur’ahn.

Now I’m going to see if I can find a quiet spot in which to summon my ship. Mawali has become entirely too dangerous.


 

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Yoremba

We are still waiting for favorable winds. The tides have been strange and unpredictable, and people are muttering that the bay is angry with them for some reason. A few have begun talking about making sacrifices. This frightens me.

I did discover that Mawali has a large and extensive library, and I have spent many hours there perusing the scrolls. I have discovered that the Yoremba known today was birthed in a bloody uprising known as the Night of Red Sands.

I can hear angry voices outside my inn. While I go see what that is about, why don’t you click this link and read about Yoremba?


 

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Circle of the Star

I am waiting for a ship to take me back north.  The weather has kept ships in port for several days now. Captain Hiyami and the Nomah sailed out yesterday, in defiance of the weather, but they were traveling south. I decided that, while waiting for fair winds, I would investigate the Circle of the Star. This is the guild of magicians responsible for protecting Mawali from pirates, raiders, or truly foul weather. They are an interesting group, open and welcoming on the surface. They offered to test me and welcome me into the Circle should I prove magically inclined. I politely declined and removed myself from the tower. I have learned in my travels that it’s best if the natives don’t discover my ability to move between the many worlds.

In any case, if you wish to know more about this Circle — all Yoremban mages guilds are called Circles – curious —  if you wish to know more, click this link: The Circle of the Star.

Isha Nawhei! and please, for the love of gods, practice safe spell casting.


 

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Worship in Mawali

I have found Tamzy’s herbs in an unexpected place: a druid Grove in the middle of Mawali. The druids were happy to harvest and prepare some for me.  Wow, that stuff’s expensive. I was chatting with one of them as we walked through the Grove and he told me an amazing story: as an infant, his parents left him at the Well in the heart of the Grove. Apparently they couldn’t afford to take care of him so they gave him to the Earth Mother. He was raised by the druids and though he considers himself a part of their Order (the Order of the Oasis) his powers are quite different. He doesn’t hoard them, either, but expends his energy every day in the surrounding areas, curing people, healing them, blessing newborns and newlyweds, and laying the dead to peaceful rest. In return, every year his Lady gives him more power and more responsibility.

His story led me to research how the people in Mawali worship their deities. You can read what I discovered by clicking this link: Worship in Mawali.

Have a blessed day, fellow travelers.


 

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Mawali’s People

I’ve been in Mawali for about a week now and have discovered that her people are as beautiful as she is.  But dangerous.  Most people will greet strangers with open arms and cries of Isha Nawhei, but others would just as soon stab you in the back and take all that you have.

Click here to read what I’ve discovered about The People of Mawali.

Isha Nawhei, fellow world-walkers!


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Mawali

Mawali is a magnificent place!  Wide avenues, pale paved streets, white buildings, and flowers everywhere!  And the people… so many people of all sorts, from tiny gnomes peddling their goods and services in little wooden carts to tall Alfar gliding by on their secretive business, and everything in between. And I’ve discovered Isha Nawhei is much more than a song.  I hear that phrase every time I turn around, as people greet each other.  If they know each other they usually hug.  If they are strangers then the response is usually a friendly “Sandaren” accompanied with a bow.  Sometimes I hear a cool “Ishdaren” response, accompanied by a slight nod.  I’m told this is used when a person is wary about the one who has greeted him or her.  It’s a more formal, but more distant, version of Sandaren.

The bazaar is one of the most exciting places I’ve been in a while, though after dark it becomes a much more dangerous place.  There are carts and kiosks, shops and stalls, and rugs piled high with goods.  And the food!  The most wonderful, spicy food I’ve had since my last visit to Istanbul.  And they even have something akin to coffee.  I spent more coin on coffee today than anything else.  You can find almost anything you can dream of in Mawali’s bazaar.  You can probably find the rest if you’re willing to risk it at night.

Here is a description of the city herself: Mawali I’m off to find Tamzy’s herbs.  Ta!


 

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Arriving in Mawali

We sailed into Mawali Bay early this morning.  I understand now why the crew believes Captain Hiyami can call the winds with his pipes: we’ve had fair winds the entire trip.   We won’t dock until this evening when we finally reach Mawali herself.  But I could see the lights from the city this morning, and from the many villages and towns scattered around the bay like jewels on a necklace.  From what I could gather, the bay is about 25 miles “deep” from the mouth to the shore, and about 75 miles long, shaped like a flattened “C”.  The water is quite shallow near the shore, and Mawali is the only place where the water is deep enough for a harbor where large ships can dock.   I’m told there are reefs as well, that the harbor was excavated from them, and that captains are meticulous in keeping the charts and following the lanes.  There may be more to it than that.  I saw Captain Hiyami at the bow, chanting and letting gold coins slip through his fingers into the water.  I was told it was a prayer for safety, but it seemed more like an offering.  To whom, I wonder.


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Isha Nawhei

Captain Hiyami of the Nomah has proven to be a fine musician.  He often dances around the poop deck playing pipes or flute.  Some of the crew believe Captain Hiyami can call the winds with his pan pipes, though the First Mate just laughed when I asked him about it.  The captain invited me to dinner a few nights ago and he taught me a wonderful little children’s song.  I’ve recorded it here for you: Isha Nawhei. 

I’ve included musical notation, but I haven’t worked with it in a long time and so it might not be perfectly accurate.  No matter.  Sing it as you wish.  He told me there have been many versions.  Each tribe or clan would have its own melody and rhythm.  Have fun!

Isha Nawhei, sandaren!  Happy travels.


 

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