Mawali’s People

I’ve been in Mawali for about a week now and have discovered that her people are as beautiful as she is.  But dangerous.  Most people will greet strangers with open arms and cries of Isha Nawhei, but others would just as soon stab you in the back and take all that you have.

Click here to read what I’ve discovered about The People of Mawali.

Isha Nawhei, fellow world-walkers!


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Mawali

Mawali is a magnificent place!  Wide avenues, pale paved streets, white buildings, and flowers everywhere!  And the people… so many people of all sorts, from tiny gnomes peddling their goods and services in little wooden carts to tall Alfar gliding by on their secretive business, and everything in between. And I’ve discovered Isha Nawhei is much more than a song.  I hear that phrase every time I turn around, as people greet each other.  If they know each other they usually hug.  If they are strangers then the response is usually a friendly “Sandaren” accompanied with a bow.  Sometimes I hear a cool “Ishdaren” response, accompanied by a slight nod.  I’m told this is used when a person is wary about the one who has greeted him or her.  It’s a more formal, but more distant, version of Sandaren.

The bazaar is one of the most exciting places I’ve been in a while, though after dark it becomes a much more dangerous place.  There are carts and kiosks, shops and stalls, and rugs piled high with goods.  And the food!  The most wonderful, spicy food I’ve had since my last visit to Istanbul.  And they even have something akin to coffee.  I spent more coin on coffee today than anything else.  You can find almost anything you can dream of in Mawali’s bazaar.  You can probably find the rest if you’re willing to risk it at night.

Here is a description of the city herself: Mawali I’m off to find Tamzy’s herbs.  Ta!


 

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Arriving in Mawali

We sailed into Mawali Bay early this morning.  I understand now why the crew believes Captain Hiyami can call the winds with his pipes: we’ve had fair winds the entire trip.   We won’t dock until this evening when we finally reach Mawali herself.  But I could see the lights from the city this morning, and from the many villages and towns scattered around the bay like jewels on a necklace.  From what I could gather, the bay is about 25 miles “deep” from the mouth to the shore, and about 75 miles long, shaped like a flattened “C”.  The water is quite shallow near the shore, and Mawali is the only place where the water is deep enough for a harbor where large ships can dock.   I’m told there are reefs as well, that the harbor was excavated from them, and that captains are meticulous in keeping the charts and following the lanes.  There may be more to it than that.  I saw Captain Hiyami at the bow, chanting and letting gold coins slip through his fingers into the water.  I was told it was a prayer for safety, but it seemed more like an offering.  To whom, I wonder.


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Isha Nawhei

Captain Hiyami of the Nomah has proven to be a fine musician.  He often dances around the poop deck playing pipes or flute.  Some of the crew believe Captain Hiyami can call the winds with his pan pipes, though the First Mate just laughed when I asked him about it.  The captain invited me to dinner a few nights ago and he taught me a wonderful little children’s song.  I’ve recorded it here for you: Isha Nawhei. 

I’ve included musical notation, but I haven’t worked with it in a long time and so it might not be perfectly accurate.  No matter.  Sing it as you wish.  He told me there have been many versions.  Each tribe or clan would have its own melody and rhythm.  Have fun!

Isha Nawhei, sandaren!  Happy travels.


 

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Tamzy Pebsworth

Tamzy is an fascinating person, to say the least.  I told her I was interested in exploring to the south and she asked if I’d get some rare plants for her while I was there.  I’m on a ship named Nomah, a pretty little two-master with an irrepressible captain, heading for the Bay of Mawali.  In the meantime, here is what I learned about Tamzy.  Well, there was considerably more detail, and some singing, and a game or two of darts.  Right.  Here she is: Tamzy Pebsworth.

 


 

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The Golden Lotus

I found the most amazing shop when I returned to Koenigsburg!  I needed to resupply after my run-in with Alfwyrd Grove, especially my potions, so I asked for the nearest alchemist.  I was directed to The Golden Lotus.  I know, it sounds like a brothel, and apparently a lot of people mistake it for that.  I’ll tell you all about its owner, Tamzy, later, but right now I have to finish packing.  She’s asked me to find some rare plants from farther south and I’m excited about going somewhere new.  It will be a long trip, so I’ll write along the way. In the meantime, you can read about the Golden Lotus alchemical shop.

Be well my fellow world-walkers!


 

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The Mad Druid

Before I left Koenigsburg, I learned that Alfwyrd Grove is run by a man named Karol Stormsinger.  Apparently as a child he “sang” a storm into being over his family’s farm, then sat in the middle while it raged.  I had heard tales of a good man, strong but gentle.  What I found was certainly strong.  Terrifyingly powerful.  But there was nothing good or gentle in it.  I have contacted the mercenary Guilds in Koenigsburg – there are three.  I leave it more experienced hands to deal with the madness I found, and I thank all the gods that I escaped with my life.

This is what little I learned: Karol Stormsinger.

Don’t go into that forest, friends, not for love nor money.


 

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Alfwyrd Grove

As I explored Koenigsburg, I began to hear troubling rumors out of the west.  Alfar using their magics to make an ancient forest attack the people.  People missing inside the forest, found dead and horribly mutilated.  Packs of wolves attacking sheep and cows and even people.  Deformed deer, rabbits, and other creatures.  The people I spoke to were scared and angry.  This doesn’t sound like the work of Alfar to me.  Even the Dokkalfar, the dark elves, wouldn’t warp nature in this way.  At least, I don’t think they would.  I have decided to pack and head west.

This is what I’ve learned about Alfwyrd Grove.

Tread lightly in the Forest my dears, for She senses your every step.

 


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Koenigsburg

I decided to sail south from Annan’s Port and check out the capital.  The trip was easy and peaceful. The most exciting thing that happened was a pod of Erde’s dolphins surrounded the ship and escorted us for most of a day.  The crew seemed very happy with this, and we had a small feast on deck that evening.  After that they called me Lucky Lady, and treated me as a treasured possession.

I usually avoid the large cities.  They’re the same everywhere: overcrowded, noisy, and dirty.  I’m glad I made an exception, for Koenigsburg was magnificent.  The city’s architecture was a blend of human, Duerfar, and Alfar construction, with squat, solid homes and shops beneath soaring arches and towers.  In the middle of the city was the Heart Grove.  I had heard that the Alfar begin new communities by planting the seed of a giant oak and making a sacrifice but nothing prepares you for the sight.  This massive tree towered over even the walls, and was visible from every part of the city.  Most people believe the spirit of the Alfar who was sacrificed has disappeared, but I’m certain I saw her, leaning against the trunk of the great Heart tree.  I left a bowl of milk and honey for her.

Click this link to read a little more about Koenigsburg.


 

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The Wanton Halfling Inn

After spending some time with Hammermaker Jerrek I returned north to Annan’s Port.  It’s my base of operations for exploring the world of Erde, and it’s a comfortable place to be.  But all the rooms at the Crested Swan were taken – some big to-do at the castle.  This led me to the docks, and the Wanton Halfling Inn.

It’s a wonderful place to be, and I love the people especially Bertram, who owns the place, and Lily, for whom it was named.  But there is something tragic in her past that you can see in her eyes on those rare occasions they’re not clouded with drink.

You can read what I learned by clicking this link: The Wanton Halfling Inn.

Go out, my fellow world-walkers!  Explore!  And may you always find a warm inn, with plenty of food, ale, and vermin-free beds.


 

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